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The Case of the Danbury Cafeteria



“Congress shall make no law… respecting the establishment of religion…
or preventing the free exercise thereof…” – 1st Amendment

In Danbury, Connecticut, the local Baptist congregation is deeply concerned about the ability to freely practice their religion. Sure, the Constitution says they can, but those words are only as good as the men who uphold them. They are pleased that Thomas Jefferson, a well-known fighter for religious freedom is now President. Still, they want to make sure where he stands, so they write him a letter. Read the rest of this entry

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No Religious Tests

Breaking both the timeline and the 4th Wall, the debate of religion and government in the United States has taken on a new and particularly partisan tone in recent days, as the Nation tries to decide what to do about the Syrian Refugee problem. Oddly enough, the debate has taken on religious tone, as some say that “as Christians” we must accept the refugees, while others say that we must not. Scripture is quoted to both support and defy the idea of bringing in the refugees.

thumbs_intelligent_design_church_state_science_and_a_large_high_wallBut as Dave so often says, people do not change. The do the same things for the same reasons usually with the same results, throughout history. Indeed, as we have already seen, they even have the same arguments.


As the debate over debate the ratification of the Constitution continued, one of the ideals bubbled to the surface – religion, and the lack thereof in the proposed Constitution, came to the front and center. But you might be surprised as to who was on which side of things, and why. And how it shows that all these centuries later, we are still debating the same questions as those who debated the Ratification of the Constitution.

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2015-6

The (Very) Liberal History of the Indiana RFRA



 

St. Peters's Church in Boerne, TX... The reason Indiana passed its RFRA Law

St. Peters’s Church in Boerne, TX… The reason Indiana passed its RFRA Law

In Indiana, controversy reigns over the State’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act, with accusations flying that it will allow rampant discrimination against gay people. So why did Indiana feel the need to pass such a law in the first place? What was it that compelled a Democrat Party controlled Congress to pass the first Religious Freedom Restoration Act by a unanimous vote in the House of Representatives and a 97-3 vote in the Senate before being signed by President Bill Clinton? And if the nations liberals saw good in the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, what is it about Indiana’s version that has them so worked up?

In this episode we take a look at the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and how we got to the point where Indiana (and a lot of other States) felt compelled to pass such a law. The story begins in the migrant worker farmed fields of Texas in the 1930’s, with a child born to migrant farm workers who will go on to fight for Civil rights and to freely express his religious beliefs…

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